Family Distraught Over 11-Year-Old's Death

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Family Photo
    April 5, 2014: Jamara Stevens, 11, was shot to death by her 2-year-old sibling, according to police, when the toddler pointed a loaded gun at her inside the family's home.

    It's been two days since 11-year old Jamara Stevens was shot and killed by her 2-year-old sibling who police say accidentally fired a .357 caliber handgun.

    The bullet pierced Jamara's arm, went through her chest and hit her heart.

    On Monday, Jamara's mother, Tiffany Goldwire and her three surviving children were visibly distraught as they sat among family and friends at their home in the Mantua section of the city,  struggling to come to grips with their loss.

    "I'm never gonna see my child again. This is a hard pill to swallow," Goldwire said.

    Amid sporadic bouts of tears and emotional outbursts, Goldwire sent a message to other mothers.

    "For all the mothers who lose their kids, I feel their pain. And to the ones that still have their children, treasure every moment with your kids because you never know when you'll never see them again," she said.

    Goldwire was reportedly in the bathroom on Saturday when, just before 10 a.m., investigators say her 14-year-old son grabbed a handgun that was allegedly left behind by the mother's boyfriend earlier that morning.

    According to police, family members told them the eldest son brought the gun into Goldwire's bedroom where he, Jamara, their 7-year-old sister, and 2-year-old brother began playing with it.

    Authorities say the 2-year-old pointed the loaded, cocked gun in the direction of Jamara and it discharged, striking and killing her.

    Police have not determined who the handgun belongs to.

    Goldwire says now she is struggling to cover the cost of an expense she never expected to have.

    "I gotta pay for a funeral. I gotta buy all of us clothing to walk through those funeral doors. I need help," she said.

    Family members say no concrete funeral plans have been made. Goldwire said she would like to start a memorial fund for her daughter, but that she is, "not in the right state of mind to do that right now."

    In the meantime, she says she is putting her pride aside and will take any help she can get to cover funeral costs.

    "Pride ain't gone get you nowhere. Tell them I need help. I need people to support me."