3 Students From Same H.S. Get Perfect SAT Scores

An extremely rare accomplishment for three students at Upper Dublin High School

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Every year, thousands of students across the county take the S.A.T.'s. Only a few hundred will achieve the coveted perfect score. But the hard work of 3 Upper Dublin High School students paid off, when they all scored perfectly on the test. (Published Friday, Feb 1, 2013)

    Three students from Montgomery County accomplished something extremely rare-- they all scored a perfect score of 2400 on their SAT.

    And what's even more rare, is that all three students are classmates at the same school.

    The Upper Dublin High School juniors dedicated years, studying for this one test.

    Julie Baldassano, 17, who is the youngest in her family, says her two big brothers left some intimidating shoes to fill, because they both scored 2380 when they took the SAT. She says she couldn't wait to tell them about her perfect score. "They said 'congrats,' yeah, it felt great to be able to tell them."

    Benjamin She, 16, says the test is all about skill. "Taking a standardized test like the SAT is just like doing a skill like Poker, it's all about what you need to do to analyze the questions."

    According to the College Board, more than one million students take the SAT each year. Last year, only 360 students got a perfect score.

    These three students share another thing in common-- they were surprised when they saw the 2400.

    "It's really exciting and I never expected it," said William Raynor, 16, who is the oldest in his family.

    For other students who stress when it comes time to take the SAT, these perfect test takers say practice and dedication really do make all the difference.

    "Don't get discouraged, I wasn't getting anywhere near 2400 when I started practicing, but the more you do the better it'll go and the easier it will get," said Baldassano, who added that besides academics, they all have other interests.

    Baldassano likes to knit and volunteers at an animal shelter. She combines her two passions by selling knitted hats to her friends for $10 each, and donates that money to the shelter. So far, she's raised $4,000 for the cause she's passionate about and says she is considering veterinary medicine for her future.

    Benjamin She is also considering a future in medicine, and has a passion for classical music. He plays violin in a youth orchestra in Philadelphia. On Sundays, he teaches English at a Chinese school for the elderly.

    Raynor volunteers at a library and plays viola in the same youth orchestra as She. He also competes in the science olympiad, math team and science fair and is looking to study medicine as well.

    "You can find time to study and do well academically while still having other passions," said Baldassano.

     


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