Judge Dismisses Sumner Redstone Mental Competency Case | NBC 10 Philadelphia

Judge Dismisses Sumner Redstone Mental Competency Case

Ex-girlfriend Manuela Herzer contended that the media mogul, who controls CBS Corp. and Viacom Inc., lacked the mental capacity to remove her from his life last year

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    Sumner Redstone attends a ceremony honoring him with the 2,467th star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame on March 30, 2012 in Hollywood.

    A judge dismissed a case Monday challenging the mental competency of media mogul Sumner Redstone.

    Los Angeles Superior Court Judge David J. Cowan ruled Monday that he found video testimony from the 92-year-old Redstone convincing. He testified that he wanted his daughter, Shari, to make medical decisions for him if he is incapacitated and that he no longer wanted his ex-girlfriend Manuela Herzer in his life.

    Herzer had contended that Redstone, who controls CBS Corp. and Viacom Inc., lacked the mental capacity to remove her from his life last year.

    Redstone's attorneys sought to dismiss the case during the first day of a competency trial that began Friday. They argued the billionaire knew what he was doing when he decided he no longer wanted Herzer in charge of making medical decisions on his behalf and that he was not the subject of undue influence of his family members and his caretakers.

    The judge had asked attorneys to present their best evidence over the weekend so he could rule. Cowan also viewed video testimony of Redstone, which he viewed Friday after attorneys for both side questioned him at his Beverly Park home.

    "The court was able to see the strong conviction he had about what he said," Cowan wrote. "He was very composed and did not appear angry. The court does not believe Redstone had any confusion about what he was asked, about his wishes or the reasons for his wishes."

    Asked by one of his lawyers what he wanted the judge to do, Redstone replied he desired that his daughter, Shari Redstone, serve as his health care agent, Cowan wrote.